Hackronym

Mirror Mirror…

Simon Denyer is a journalist and author who has worked in the field for more than 30 years. He currently works as South Asia bureau chief of The Washington Post, but he also writes extensively on other topics such as terrorism, extremism, and human rights. His work has taken him all over the world.

Simon Denyer’s interest in journalism began when he was a teenager at school in England. He studied politics, philosophy, and economics (PPE) at Oxford University but spent most of his free time learning about computers because it fascinated him how they worked – especially programming.

Denyer began his career in journalism at The Guardian, where he was a trainee for two years before becoming an assistant to the technology editor. He later moved on to work with the Business and Technology department of The Independent newspaper as their US correspondent. His move into writing about politics occurred when he became deputy business editor of “The Observer.”

After working for many years in the UK, Simon Denyer moved to Hong Kong and joined Dow Jones as an Asian technology correspondent. His time at The Washington Post began when he joined them on his return from China, where he had been writing about internet censorship issues such as “The Great Firewall of China.”

Simon Denyer has written several books, including his most recent one, “, featured in several publications. He is also the author of two other books: “and. “”

His work on The Great Firewall of China was recognized when he won the 2010 Paul Foot Award for investigative, enterprising, or campaign journalism – an award that recognizes excellence at a national level by journalists in the UK.

He was also recognized when he won a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship from Columbia University, awarded to journalists and broadcasters who show exceptional service in their profession, particularly those who excel at teaching or business journalism.

His work with The Washington Post has been honored many times over the years, including by Asian American Journalists Association, the Society of Publishers in Asia, and The Royal Statistical Society.