Renown Health Opens New Clinic in Local Mall

Renown Health will be opening a new facility or clinic located at the Summit Mall in South Reno this fall. This new clinic will offer patients primary care services and has a lab to process tests when needed.

They want to provide a more comfortable setting for patients when they come into the office. Dr. McCormick says they designed the office to look like a home’s living room. It is supposed to look very comfortable. We have conference rooms to discuss patient cases. Changes will be made slowly to the clinic because of President Trumps proposed changes to healthcare.

This clinic currently has 11 members on staff. The architecture of the building was done by a firm called MBA Architects and Interior Designs. They used all local contractors to complete the new facility. The increased population in Northern Nevada provides a growing need for a new health care facility for local citizens. They have 12 clinics in this area.

Renown Health is a locally owned healthcare facility that has a network of labs, clinics, hospitals, primary care doctors and specialists. They provide local residents live with a wide array of services to help patients lead healthy lives. They have several labs that provide testing and appointments using mobile devices.

They have pediatric care for babies and children from birth to age 18. They provide services like vaccinations, physical exams, help with diabetes, allergies, asthma, colds, and other illness. They provide diagnostic imaging to help doctors make accurate diagnoses. These clinics provide tests for cancer and special treatments and programs for different types of cancer.

The Renown Network in Northern Nevada has pulmonary services for those patients that need treatment for their lungs. They treat patients with COPD, emphysema, asthma, and other conditions. Other specialties include heart, women health issues,and orthropedics. They offer families and individuals comprehensive health care

Renown Community : http://bestmedicinenews.org/community/

The Miracle of Garlic

Healthy eating habits are finally trending, and it’s time that we all get on board. So many ingredients get overlooked that could, and should, be incorporated into almost every meal. Garlic is one of those ingredients.

Properly preparing garlic is an art. Anyone who has ever used it knows this to be a daunting task at times. You have to separate the clove, peel the skin off, crush it and mince it. Even with the utmost care, it’s rarely done correctly. Here you can learn how to properly prepare garlic, so that you will be willing to use it more frequently.

Garlic is extremely nutritious, and it has very few calories. A little bit of almost everything that we need is jam-packed into those little cloves. It is rich in vitamins C, B6 and Manganese, and it also has protein and good carbs.

When you use garlic as a supplement, it is known to combat sickness and boost the immune system. Colds and flues can be warded off or their effects lessened with garlic. That alone is reason enough to add it whenever you can, especially during this time of year. In addition to that, garlic can improve cholesterol levels, reduce blood pressure and may even prevent Alzheimer’s Disease.

In ancient cultures, garlic was used to fight fatigue and to increase work capacity. It was one of the earliest substances to be used to enhance performance. If you made a resolution on January 1st to exercise more, garlic may be your way out of feeling groggy and unmotivated.

In my opinion, garlic is magnificent! The smell, the flavor and the health benefits are all ideal to me. It adds to every dish that I cook, and when I don’t use it fresh, my meals seem to suffer. Some don’t share my passion for it, but over time you could also love this beneficial ingredient. Give garlic a chance, and you could live longer and live better.

 

Just Relax, Breath

Has this election cycle stressed you out? Are the kids really getting to you? Is work frustrating you? We all know life can really try the nerves. There’s there’s good news for everyone feeling overwhelmed, exciting new science is showing just how effective breathing exercises are for improving anxiety. Breathing exercises not only improve anxiety, but it can also improve your immune system and alertness.

 

We’ve all heard someone say to their friend “just relax and take a breath,” it turns out there’s some truth to the old saying. An associate professor at Boston University just completed a study using yoga to treat depressive symptoms. After his 12 week study, it was seen that not only the external symptoms of depression were relieved, but the biochemical symptoms were relieved as well. While the study was quite small, the results are very promising especially for those who want to improve their mood.

 

There are numerous different ways to use breathing to relax. This quick instructional video can give you an idea of how to use breathing to relax, experts say you can use this technique and others like for 20 minutes a day. It is hypothesized that by taking deep breaths you’re telling your body that everything is okay and triggers it to relax.

 

Breathing exercises won’t only improve your nerves, it has also been shown to increase your alertness and immune system. A recent study at the University of South Carolina showed that breathing exercises decreased the levels of cytokines that are associated with stress and inflammation. It will be exciting to find out just how powerful good breathing habits are as scientists unravel this simple practice.

 

Adopting a habit of breathing exercise can improve your life, allowing you to have better health, and all you have to do is just put some time aside for some simple exercises. So why not take a little time to learn about healthy breathing and watch your anxiety decrease and your health improve. Next time life grows overwhelming remember to just relax and breath.

 

Health Benefits of Choosing Water over a Sugary Drink

Virginia Tech University has released a new study suggesting that replacing just one sugary beverage with water per day can have enormous health benefits over time. Sugary beverages include sodas, energy drinks, fruit juices, coffee with added sugar, and even “diet” drinks. According to the study, choosing water over one of these drinks just one time a day can decrease overall calorie intake and can reduce the risk of obesity, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes. Swapping one eight ounce high calorie beverage with water can also make a difference in overall health.

The study took place from 2007-2012 and included over 19,000 adults. Kiyah J. Duffy, an adjunct faculty member with Virginia Tech and one of the researchers of the study, found that replacing just one beverage with water could drop the amount of calories consumed from drinks from 17 to 11 percent. “Even those who consumed more sugary drinks per day could still benefit from water replacement, dropping the amount of calories coming from beverages to less than 25 percent of their daily caloric intake,” says Duffy. Co-authoring the study with Duffy was Jennifer Poti, an assistant professor of nutrition and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

The study also found that people who chose more water tended to make healthier dietary choices overall. People who drink more high-calorie beverages were also more likely to eat more red meat, starches, and junk food. Those who drank water were more likely to have diets higher in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

While this study was funded by the Drinking Water Research Foundation, the results do follow what the Dietary Guidelines of America suggest, which is that individuals do not consume more than ten percent of their calories from added sugar. Reducing calories consumed from sweetened drinks also increases scores on the Healthy Beverage Index – a system that evaluates drinking habits and how they affect diet and health. It is based on standards created by the Beverage Guidance Panel and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This index was created in 2015 by Duffy and Brenda Davy, a nutrition researcher from Virginia Tech.