A recent article published by the Huffington Post discussed the health differences between fresh leafy greens and canned greens. For the last decade or so, Americans have been increasingly exposed to alternative dietary recommendations in an attempt to hinder the progression of the cancers and heart disease that have plagued the west for the last hundred years. More and more, Americans are finding that the addition of dark, leafy greens to their daily diets can vastly increase life spans by limiting the number of free radicals present in the body, effectively cleansing the liver, kidneys, blood, and intestines, and providing beneficial vitamins and minerals that are not found in processed American foods.

 

Although the benefits of the daily inclusion of dark, leafy greens has been declared to be beneficial by most major health outlets, a debate as to whether or not canned greens should been included in this beneficial category has been ongoing. The general consensus among the health concerned is that canned vegetables do not provide the necessary vitamin and nutrient content to compare with the benefits provided by the consumption of fresh leafy greens. The canning process that most large distribution companies use when developing canned vegetables does much to harm the nutrient levels in the vegetables.

 

Canned vegetables are often over cooked, a process which virtually destroys the bio-available nutrients in the greens. They are also packed with preservatives to help super markets to keep the product on shelves for extended periods of time in an effort to attain the maximum profitability. Additionally, canned vegetables can contain a level of mildew that is unnoticeable to the human eye and is, therefore, easily ingested by the average consumer. The Huffington Post article on the subject mentioned that the FDA does not classify mildew present in some canned vegetables as entirely harmful to the population, but the average consumer would probably disagree and desire not to ingest food that has any percentage of mildew present. The Huffington Post also mentions that canned greens like spinach contained larvae or larvae fragments from spinach worms that were harvested with the greens. Again the problem is undetected by the human eye because of the extensive preparation by the manufacturer. All in all, health enthusiasts are in agreement that greens are best when they are fresh.

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